7 Coins with Hidden Features Only Experts Know About 

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1. U.S. 2005 Kansas State Quarter ("In God We Rust") 

A notable error found in some of these quarters is the result of a grease-filled die, causing the T in "Trust" to be weak or entirely missing. This has led collectors to humorously refer to these coins as bearing the phrase "In God We Rust." 

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2. Canadian 1953 "Shoulder Fold" and "No Shoulder Fold" Varieties  

The effigy of Queen Elizabeth II on the 1953 Canadian penny comes in two varieties: "Shoulder Fold" and "No Shoulder Fold." The difference lies in the detail of the Queen's shoulder strap of her gown, which was modified partway through the year.  

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3. Australian 2000 $1/10c Mule 

A mule coin is one that has been minted with obverse and reverse dies that were not intended to be paired together. In this case, a small number of Australian $1 coins were mistakenly minted with the obverse of a $1 coin and the reverse of a 10c coin, making them significantly more valuable due to their rarity. 

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4. U.S. 1943 Copper Penny 

In 1943, due to the demands of World War II, U.S. pennies were made from steel coated with zinc. However, a few were mistakenly struck on leftover copper planchets from the previous year. These copper pennies are incredibly rare and valuable. 

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5. U.K. 2008 20 Pence Without Date 

In 2008, an error in the Royal Mint resulted in the production of around 200,000 20 pence coins without a date, making them the first undated British coins in over 300 years. These coins have become highly sought after by collectors. 

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6. U.S. 1937-D "Three-Legged" Buffalo Nickel 

Due to a mint error caused by overpolishing the die, the front left leg of the buffalo on some 1937-D nickels is missing. This peculiar error has made the "three-legged" buffalo nickel one of the most famous and valuable error coins in American numismatics. 

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7. Euro 2 Cent Coins with Incuse Edge Lettering 

Some Euro 2 cent coins feature fine, incuse lettering around the edge of the coin, which varies by country and is often overlooked. For instance, French 2 cent coins have "2 ★" repeated six times but inverted every other time.  

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